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Suffering from sales desperation?

 

Suffering from sales desperation?

We’re halfway through our ‘90-Day Brilliant Sales Challenge‘ and next week we start our new intake (there’s still time to sign up and join us).

This week our livestream was about demonstrating and communicating value throughout the sales process. This is important because while you THINK you solve certain problems and that’s why your prospects should work with you, the reasons that will bring them to a sales decision may be different.

It’s important to start with the problem that they have – and that they worry about solving. As they say: “Give them what they want, then give them what they need.”

It’s important to be in your prospect’s shoes, and to have empathy for where they are and what they need to solve.  You need to become a trusted advisor during the sales process – and then as a trusted advisor you need to come from a place of service and share your thoughts, experience and insights to the customer.

But to get to this place, you need to consider the problems worrying your prospect as you create, plan and then have sales conversations.

Because trying to solve a problem that you think the prospect has, and they aren’t worried  about (or a problem they don’t think they have) isn’t going to help you – even if you think it’s a huge problem and one that they need to solve. You have to start the sales process where they are, and address their challenges and problems.

If you feel looming sales desperation then it’s important to avoid  ‘sales panic’ – when you feel that your back is against a wall and your mind loses focus – and you frantically skip from one thing to another desperate for something to work.  You may feel like you’ve lost control but it’s important to recognize that you haven’t – but you do need to take a step back, plan, focus and execute (how to structure your workday is another area we work on during our 90-day sales challenge).

Want to shake up how you think about sales and bring more money in? Then take action and join us tomorrow for our November 7th ’90-Day Brilliant Sales Challenge.’

Do you suffer from Someday Syndrome? 

someday syndrome
“So when is someday?”

I have frustration around the uncommitted time known as “someday.”

This week I discovered it’s something I have in common with Dolores, a wholesome, blue-dress-clad android in HBO’s Western-themed sci-fi thriller, Westworld. When Dolores’s beau, Teddy, says he’ll whisk her away “someday” you can tell something’s going to snap in her circuitry.

When I’m working with clients who are keen to move into action and get their work, lives or projects into gear, it’s important that they realize that someday doesn’t exist. And I work with them to set a timeline for themselves, or commit to a date.

Are you suffering from Someday Syndrome?  Here’s a simple fix (but only if you do it):

  1. What is the thing you are going to do “someday?”
  2. Get a calendar.
  3. Pick a date.
  4. Commit to it.
  5. Make the date public in some way — so you’re really committing to it.
  6. Take a small step to support what you are going to do.

Yes, I know it sounds simple. But even declaring the intention of what you want — and when you’re going to do something about it — can get the wheels of the universe in motion. Instead of sitting around, waiting for “someday.”

Are you clear on your sales numbers?

Are your sales numbers clear in your head or all jumbled up?

If you’re a business owner or a member of a founding team, or responsible for business development in any way, then here’s a few quick questions:

1. How many leads did you create last quarter?  How many do you expect to generate this month?

2. What’s your conversion rate from leads to opportunities? i.e. how many of leads do you convert into opportunities?

3. How many opportunities convert into sales?

4. How much revenue do you want to generate this month? This quarter? 

As we continue in the final quarter of the year, it’s important to know these numbers – because if you’re not working from your revenue goal and then calculating the opportunities you need, and the leads you need to create those opportunities, then hitting your number becomes an actual goal – and not some ‘hope-based’ strategy of revenue generation.

Join us for our ’90-Day Brilliant Sales Challenge’ to not just learn – but to apply – goals to your business.  In this challenge we will help you create DAILY sales habits that shift your business and give you the tools, techniques and resources to SHIFT your sales.  Because brilliant sales happen when selling is a DAILY habit – and one that you enjoy.

Momentum, mastery and money

Last week I held one of our workshops in Boston.  When I was talking about how to increase sales, someone asked me about the need for consistency.

I think consistency when you’re selling is crucial – consistency creates a habit, which means that you spend time selling and get comfortable with actions that leads to sales. This need to get comfortable is important, because it creates momentum. Momentum creates practice, which leads to mastery.

This sales equation [momentum + mastery = money] is the key behind our ’90 Day Brilliant Sales Challenge’ which invites entrepreneurs and business owners to commit 90 days to transform their thoughts, attitudes and actions around sales – and in the process to change their results.

Ask yourself the following:

  • Are you making the money in your business that you want to make?
  • Do you, hand on heart, have an unstoppable momentum when it comes to sales?
  • Do you feel that sales – one of the most important activities for your business – is something you have mastered?

If you want to change one – or all – of these answers, then why not join us for our 90-Day Brilliant Sales Challenge.  Want to join us for the next intake, then act now and sign up here to secure a space.

 

 

 

Whatever you are, be a good one

“I get paid to be nice to people.”

This is what Adam, a manager at California Pizza Kitchen, said to me and a row of other customers at the Boston restaurant’s bar.           

He beamed as he said he was having an “awesome day” and asked me how my day was (“brilliant”), and continued to say how thankful he was for a job which where he was paid to be nice to people and be friendly. And he meant it. As he smiled, each of us along the bar couldn’t help but smile back.

 This makes me think of a quote from William Makepeace Thackeray: “Whatever you are, be a good one.”

In business, this means coming from a place of gratitude, of being thankful and coming from a place of service. In my sales workshops, I talk about the need to have engagement, enthusiasm and excitement for what you do and how you help the world.

Sometimes as business owners and as busy entrepreneurs we get distracted by the volume of what we think needs to be done, of a constant sense of urgency to deliver and complete things, and we can forget to come from a place of thankfulness — for what we do, where we are and the possibility of what is before us.

How thankful are you for where you are now, for what you can do to help other people, to be of service?

Do you have ‘reference resistance?’

Are you comfortable asking for references to support your business?  Or do you have what I call ‘reference resistance?’

Whether it’s ex-customers, ex-colleagues, business partners, or current clients, if you’re an entrepreneur or business owner you need to develop the habit of asking for references (and act on it).

This is because real people have real influence. Gathering and sharing references is important in helping prospects to get to know you. References share real-world experience of what you are like to work with, what you are capable of, the transformation you deliver to the people or businesses you work with, and your expertise.

There’s also a cost associated with not asking for references – this includes damaging your sales, slowing your business success and limiting your own reach.

Asking for references is a great exercise. Even the act of asking for references reinforces the position of strength and expertise that you come from (and is a great step to overcoming reference resistance).

When I speak to clients and entrepreneurs that are resistant to asking for references, I ask them to think – and to be honest with themselves about where their resistance is coming from. Here are some of the types of reference resistanceI frequently hear about asking for references:

  • Negative self-thinking (that you aren’t good enough)
  • Feeling it’s selfish (or may be taken as an attempt for flattery)
  • Worry that the person we ask may refuse and damage an existing sales relationship
  • Don’t want to ‘bother’ people
  • Not knowing what to say

Want to know how to overcome ‘reference resistance’ then sign up for access to my new worksheet to help you overcome reference resistance.