Your main financial resource (Hint: look in a mirror)

What is your main entrepreneurial or startup financial resource?  You may not embrace it, but your main financial resources is you

When I first work with clients and I ask to share their main financial resources, I hear a lot of different answers: loans; salary from their company or employer; money that comes into their family, such as a spouse’s income; or credit cards.

But there’s one answer I’m really searching for – your ability to earn.

Your ability to earn is an immense power that many people simply do not fully embrace. This reluctance to fully step in can manifest itself in many ways. If you’re working for someone else, it may result in you not giving 110 percent to your current role and expected responsibilities. When I work with entrepreneurs, this frequently manifests itself by letting opportunities slip through self-sabotage, twinned with an inner refusal to step into the awesome earning power they have.

Many entrepreneurs simply don’t follow up and commit time to sales. And it’s not necessarily the fact that many founders juggle their startup with other responsibilities. It more comes down to a core belief that you don’t think you are worth what you want and as a result, don’t consider yourself as your main financial resource. But you are. And the best news? – You have everything you need right now to earn and get the results you want. You simply need to get out of your own way.

If you want to step into your awesome money-creating and sales power (believe me, you have it!), then join me for a free online training: How to Make 2017 Your Best Sales Year Ever.

Do you suffer from Someday Syndrome? 

someday syndrome
“So when is someday?”

I have frustration around the uncommitted time known as “someday.”

This week I discovered it’s something I have in common with Dolores, a wholesome, blue-dress-clad android in HBO’s Western-themed sci-fi thriller, Westworld. When Dolores’s beau, Teddy, says he’ll whisk her away “someday” you can tell something’s going to snap in her circuitry.

When I’m working with clients who are keen to move into action and get their work, lives or projects into gear, it’s important that they realize that someday doesn’t exist. And I work with them to set a timeline for themselves, or commit to a date.

Are you suffering from Someday Syndrome?  Here’s a simple fix (but only if you do it):

  1. What is the thing you are going to do “someday?”
  2. Get a calendar.
  3. Pick a date.
  4. Commit to it.
  5. Make the date public in some way — so you’re really committing to it.
  6. Take a small step to support what you are going to do.

Yes, I know it sounds simple. But even declaring the intention of what you want — and when you’re going to do something about it — can get the wheels of the universe in motion. Instead of sitting around, waiting for “someday.”

Momentum, mastery and money

Last week I held one of our workshops in Boston.  When I was talking about how to increase sales, someone asked me about the need for consistency.

I think consistency when you’re selling is crucial – consistency creates a habit, which means that you spend time selling and get comfortable with actions that leads to sales. This need to get comfortable is important, because it creates momentum. Momentum creates practice, which leads to mastery.

This sales equation [momentum + mastery = money] is the key behind our ’90 Day Brilliant Sales Challenge’ which invites entrepreneurs and business owners to commit 90 days to transform their thoughts, attitudes and actions around sales – and in the process to change their results.

Ask yourself the following:

  • Are you making the money in your business that you want to make?
  • Do you, hand on heart, have an unstoppable momentum when it comes to sales?
  • Do you feel that sales – one of the most important activities for your business – is something you have mastered?

If you want to change one – or all – of these answers, then why not join us for our 90-Day Brilliant Sales Challenge.  Want to join us for the next intake, then act now and sign up here to secure a space.

 

 

 

Sales and finding customers: What are you doing to find prospects?

How good are you at finding customers?

Whatever your business is, no matter how fabulous or amazing your product or service, you need to attract new prospects. To do that consistently you have to set up processes and deliberate.

There are many ways to define leads, but when I work with clients to help them with their sales processes, at the broadest definition I start with ‘leads’ which are cold contacts and when these are qualified they are ‘opportunities’.

First, how big is your list of prospects that you would define as ‘leads’ or ‘opportunities’?
When did you last contact these prospects? Do you have a regular newsletter, series of educational updates, market insights or perspectives that you share with them?
How many leads did you generate last month? Last quarter? How many do you plan to generate this month?
If you don’t know, you need to set up a baseline and start tracking this number – so you can see what’s working.

So how can you find potential new prospects and generate leads? Here’s some ideas of where you can find new customers – and to help them find you:

  • □ Workshops
  • □ Webinars
  • □ Podcasts
  • □ Downloads: e-books, how-tos, checklists
  • □ Attending or sponsoring events, tradeshows
  • □ Networking
  • □ Social media: LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook etc.
  • □ Blogging
  • □ Videos

Frustrated by not having enough prospects and want to ramp up your sales? Then why not shift your business results and sign up now for my 60-Day Sales Challenge.

Dylan Thomas and fabric swatches (stop stopping yourself)

I spent a brilliant weekend at my brother’s wedding in London, where I was honored to be asked to do a reading. I wanted to read something to reflect our Welsh heritage. And as my new sister-in-law is a talented dressmaker, I picked a passage from Dylan Thomas’s “Under Milk Wood,” which shares the dreams of Mr. Mog Edwards, the town draper, and Miss Myfanwy Price, dressmaker and sweet-shop keeper.

To separate the two voices, I wanted to use props: a hot water bottle to represent Miss Price’s “lonely, loving hottwaterbottled body” and a book of material swatches for Mr. Mog Edwards. The first was an easy purchase, I just needed to find a clothing, dressmaker or furniture shop in Richmond-upon-Thames (a lovely area in London) that would lend me a swatch book.

So I set off to ask stores to help me. This is how it went:

No. 1 said they didn’t have material swatch books, and looked at me a little quizzically.  

No. 2 only sold completed pieces and didn’t have sample books, but suggested places I could try and gave me directions.

No. 3 was a very upscale store (to be honest, each store was, as it was Richmond-upon-Thames) with several store assistants that stood and watched me as I explained why I wanted to borrow a swatch book for 24 hours. One of the assistants then looked away from me, and actually started talking about me and my “stupid” request – while I was stood there – and then started sniggering, which seemed to encourage the other assistants to follow her lead. For a moment I felt embarrassed and silly, dismissed, with several people laughing at me.

This is a key moment: the point where you can stop. Whether it’s in sales and how you respond to a negative prospect, or anything that you want in life where you reach what could be interpreted as a roadblock and an inner voice says, “Well, that’s that then – at least you tried,” it’s the point where you give yourself permission to give up.

I shrugged my shoulders and went to No. 4, where the store manager couldn’t have been more helpful. He was intrigued by what I was reading that would involve a fabric swatch book as a prop, then showed me where they kept all their swatch books, gave me a choice of swatch books and wished me luck with the reading.

I did get a few odd looks as I stood up during the ceremony clutching a hot water bottle and a large swathe of fabrics, but the reading was well-received. 

The lesson? I could have stopped after store No. 3, feeling more than a little rejected, but able to comfort myself that I had tried.

Where do you stop? In life, in sales and in things that YOU want from your life, where do you stop out of fear of failure, of potential ridicule and with the self-affirmation “Well, at least I tried?”’

Imagine if you didn’t stop – and you pushed beyond the thing that you think may not work, or the thing that you think may make you look silly, or “fail.”

Want to ‘Stop Stopping?’ then why not check out my new training for individuals who want to shift behavior and shift results.

‘Sales’ is not a dirty word…

I’ve been spending a lot of time speaking at workshops and events for business owners.

I always like to ask attendees about their perception of sales. In many cases, I hear that sales is not held in high regard — it’s not seen as some highly respected discipline. It’s even viewed as a ‘dirty’ thing to do.

This is a problem that many business owners face. You create a business based on something you love — a passion you have, a skill you can’t wait to share with the world and with your prospective clients — but … what? You have to sell? Somehow this comes as a surprise to many.

Yes, you have to sell.

But you also have to remember what makes a ‘good’ sale and what makes a ‘bad’ sale (want to hear more about that, then sign up for my Brilliant Sales Tips). But the basic fact of business is you have to sell your product, service or expertise to make money. And without money, you are not running a business, you have a hobby — one that takes up all your time, energy and, well, your life.

So time to shift your mindset and to repeat after me: sales is NOT a dirty word. It’s an important part of your business and one that you have to actively pursue.

Looking to really shift your attitude, behavior and commitment to sales? Join me for my next 60-day Brilliant Sales Challenge.